Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Seven Things I Do When Writing

Weston Ochse hit me with the challenge to list seven things I do when writing. I pass this challenge along to Gene O’Neill (Gene O’Neill) and John Palisano.

(As an aside, this should be a list of seven things I ‘wish’ I did rather than what I actually do... the list would be so much easier to compile.)

1. I write whenever I can find some time away from work and teaching and kids and other life responsibilities, but I find the best times for me are early morning (7:00 – 11:00) or mid-afternoon (3:00 – 6:00).

2. Regardless how busy I am, I author at least one word every day. Yes, that is ONE word; Meaning, if I’m stressed for time, I force myself to at least open a work-in-progress every single day and add something to it, so that it continues to be fresh in my mind. Ideally I aim for 1,000 words a day, but if I write only that minimal ‘one’, it’s one more word than the day previous. Usually if I only write a minimal amount over the course of a few days, I find myself scripting in my head, so that when I do sit down for some hours, I let everything that’s been bottled up just pour out.

3. I allow myself ‘social media breaks’. Jonathan Maberry says he attends social media for five minutes of every hour and writes the other fifty-five minutes. During the social media break, he adds comments or tweets or posts (and not just promoting himself, but promoting others as well) or adds to conversations about writing. I attend this advice.

4. I drink coffee and water both by the gallon.

5. I always read what I’ve written last before I start penning something new.

6. I read the works of others in between my own writing.

7. I resent myself for not writing more, for not writing better, for not inciting the world to herald me as the wonder of our generation. I fill myself with doubt and suspicion whenever somebody gives me a compliment or an editor accepts my story for publication. I think I’m terrible, then I think I’m brilliant, then I’m terrible again (all depending on the weather, and time of day, and what I just ate), and I tell the voices in my head to compromise that I’m somewhat average, but to keep at it, and each day I’ll get a little better.

8. (Okay, #8 is technically beyond the limit of the seven-list challenge, but who says writers have to follow rules?) I work on multiple projects simultaneously, and eventually finish most of them.


Wednesday, February 11, 2015

MY FOUR YEAR WRITE-IVERSARY

This month marks my four year ‘Write-iversary’, meaning four years ago, in February, 2011, I decided to pursue fiction writing for the sake of publication.

I’ve kept track of every fiction short story submission that I’ve sent out during that time. As of today, I’ve accumulated 70 acceptances (including a few reprints), and 235 rejections, giving me a 22.95% acceptance rate. Another 26 stories are slated in the ‘Pending decision’ or ‘To find a home’ stacks. In addition, I’ve a couple dozen more stories written and relegated to the deepest of trunks. And, add to all that, my non-fiction articles, interviews, book reviews, blurbs, and introductions. My next milestone is to finish a full-length novel, which is currently about two-thirds completed (Chestnut ’Bo).

In addition to short stories, I also edited and published two anthologies (Dark Tales of Lost Civilizations and After Death...), the latter of which won the 2013 Bram Stoker Award. I wrote a novella, Baggage of Eternal Night, which was a finalist for the 2014 International Thriller Award. Some of my short stories also won or placed in various indie writing contests that I used to participate in before realizing that paying fees for such awards was ultimately unsubstantial.

I’ve made mistakes, but also gained a tremendous amount of knowledge and experience in publishing, editing, and crafting stories. I’ve made wonderful friends and am still thrilled as a fan-boy each time I get to share a T.O.C. or even just communicate with an author I admire (er, swoon over!). I’ve met and/or worked with Joe R. Lansdale, Bentley Little, Ellen Datlow, Tom Monteleone, Steve Rasnic Tem, Ramsey Campbell, Stephen Jones, and others whom I’ve been reading for 22+ years, not to mention authors whom I’ve became familiar with and have inspired my dark fiction reading in the more recent 10-15 years, like John Joseph Adams, Jack Ketchum, John Skipp, Chuck Palahniuk, Robert McCammon, and many, many more. Plus there are just those other writers who have been particularly supportive and benevolent to me, such as Lisa Morton, Weston Ochse, Gene O’Neil, Stan Swanson, all the members of HWA L.A. chapter, as well as a hundred others.

All this in four years, while I work full-time, raise infant children, continue academic coursework, volunteer for several organizations, and engage in all other manner of life obligations and responsibilities...

My only regret is that I waited so long to even ‘try’. I loved writing in high school but went to college under the impression I needed to focus on ‘serious-minded’ business, and never the twain shall meet. Although I ultimately did pursue other creative endeavors, I waited until I was 35 years old before I decided to attempt that childhood dream of writing... I torture myself now thinking where I could be with an additional fifteen years of experience under my belt. Ah well, I’m elated with the adventure I’ve found thus far and can only hope it continues for countless more years!

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Book Reviews (January, 2015)

Being as it’s only 3 1/2 months since my last post, here are some latest book reviews! Each of the following books may be purchased through any large book store or online through www.amazon.com.

***

REVIEWED: Not for Nothing
WRITTEN BY: Stephen Graham Jones
PUBLISHED: March 18, 2014

Not for Nothing is a gritty, twisting detective tale set in small-town Stanton, Texas, where everyone knows each other and business affairs are conducted by the ghosts of high school cliques. In fact, one of the clever and most successful elements of this story is the yearbook-esque feeling of it; the protagonist, Nick Bruiseman, a disgraced ex-cop and now-drunk security guard fumbles his way through a series of double crosses and murders, and all the time every person he comes in contact with —either friend, enemy, ex-lover, etc.—is from his school or is the child from someone from his school.

The book is rather slow and leisurely to read, much like life in Stanton. The story is drenched in sadness and dejection, but also in humor and suspense. It has a hundred twists, and not all of them are necessary, but it’s a thrilling ride nonetheless. The narrative seemed a bit choppy at times, but that ties into Nick’s perpetually half-drunk take on the world around him. Then again, this style of writing seems to be a signature of the author, Stephen Graham Jones; reading him is as of someone verbally telling a story, with detours, hiccups, gaps, asides, and all other means of genuine conversation. Rather than polished-smooth, the writing is raw and legitimate and embodies an unfamiliar beauty.

As a side note, after reading the first couple of pages, my mind slowly recoiled in a double-take of reluctant, dawning horror. This book was written in second person point of view: The audacity! The inhumanity! The dread! It’s a rare-enough feat to pull off a successful short story in this POV, but I don’t know if I’ve ever read a full-length book in this way which has held my interest (excepting childhood Choose-Your-Own-Adventures!), and I was instinctively averse to continue. However, Jones managed to build a story filled with empathy, sadness, humor, insight, that in retrospect seems integral to having been 2nd POV.

Five out of Five stars


***

REVIEWED: The End in All Beginnings
WRITTEN BY: John F.D. Taff
PUBLISHED: September, 2014

“The End in All Beginnings” is a solid collection of novellas by John F.D. Taff, who’s been writing dark fiction for nearly a quarter of a century. Each of the stories is a thoughtful take, relating in some way to death and sorrow. Probably the least morose story happened to be my favorite, “Love in the Time of Zombies,” which was quite funny and with great content. “What Becomes God” is a long path into tragedy with a ‘killer’ ending. “The Long, Long Breakdown” was a gloomy, drowning post-apocalyptic ‘world’ that this author really needs to expand upon in future works. The other stories were fine in their own ways, but these listed were my top three picks from the T.O.C.

Four-and-a-half out of Five stars


***

REVIEWED: Motherless Child
WRITTEN BY: Glen Hirshberg
PUBLISHED: May, 2014 by Tor Books (originally in 2012 by Earthling)

Motherless Child may be classified as a vampire book, but it is not related to the well-worn tropes familiar to most readers. Glen Hirshberg’s writing is as literary as any classical author, filled with pathos, explorations of the human condition, and a contrast of the good vs. evil theme, but with unexpected outcomes. Two young mothers, Natalie and Sophie, who have been turned into vampires, must leave their beloved children behind to travel the country searching for answers, trying to fight the effects of what they’ve become, until the inevitable showdown with those who changed them forever.

Four-and-a-half out of Five stars




***


Midnight Cheers,

Eric J. Guignard




Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Recent Short Story Publications

I’ve had some recent short story publications over the past few months that I’m particularly excited about!

*****


The first is: Dreams of a Little Suicide, which I consider to be one of my best pieces of writing yet. This tells the story (urban legend... truth... ?!) of the munchkin that hung himself on-screen during the Wizard of Oz.

Here’s the movie clip showing the tragedy:
Hanging Munchkin (YouTube)
 
And the story is for sale in the anthology book, Hell Comes To Hollywood II: Twenty-Two More Tales of Tinseltown Terror (Volume 2) (October 1, 2014). Hell Comes To Hollywood II (Amazon)

*****

My next story, An Unpleasant Truth About Death, is my first contribution to a ‘shared world anthology,’ meaning each of the authors writes a story that interrelates into one story line. In this case, it’s a collection of tales about teenagers playing Truth or Dare on Halloween. Great fun to write!

This story is for sale in the anthology book, Truth or Dare? (October 31, 2014).
Truth or dare? A Halloween anthology (Perpetual Publishing)

*****

My southern humor/ Devil tale, Midnight and Jefe Bowman, was purchased and published online at Bad Dream Entertainment (September 21, 2014) here: Midnight and Jefe Bowman (Bad Dream)

I also read a seven minute excerpt of it at the CIA bar (California Institute of Abnormal Arts) in North Hollywood, part of the "Shades and Shadows" reading series. That reading is available here:
Reading Midnight and Jefe Bowman (YouTube)

*****
 
 My sci-fi/ western tale, Last Days of the Gunslinger, John Amos, was purchased and published online at Buzzy Magazine (July 3, 2014). This is a fast-paced tribute to western weird tales and available here: Last Days of the Gunslinger, John Amos (BuzzyMag)
*****

Lastly, my sci-fi story about Planck time and Zeno’s paradox, Living in the Moment, was published online at Bewildering Stories on April 21, 2014 here: Living in the Moment (Bewildering Stories)

 
*****
Including reprints, I’m up to about 15 stories published so far during this year. Not bad, considering I work full time (and more than one job, sometimes), plus continuing college courses, volunteering for various groups, and raising two small children!
And, as always, I’m also awaiting word of acceptance or rejection on many other stories that are under consideration with publishers and further awaiting publishing dates for purchased stories that hover in some nebulous back-office limbo.


Midnight cheers,

Eric J. Guignard

_________________________________

E
ric J. Guignard writes dark and speculative fiction from the outskirts of Los Angeles. Assorted stories and articles that bear his byline may be found in the disreputable publications reserved for back alley bazaars. As an editor, Eric’s published the anthologies, Dark Tales of Lost Civilizations and After Death…, the latter of which won the 2013 Bram Stoker Award®. Read his novella, Baggage of Eternal Night (a finalist for the 2014 International Thriller Writers Award), and watch for many more forthcoming books, including Chestnut ’Bo (TBP 2016). Visit Eric at: www.ericjguignard.com, his blog: www.ericjguignard.blogspot.com, or Twitter: @ericjguignard.
 

Friday, September 26, 2014

An Afternoon of Horror II at the Pasadena Central Library

Are you in southern California on October 4? If so, come visit: An Afternoon of Horror II at the Pasadena Central Library!

On Saturday, October 4, 2014, from 1:00 – 5:00 p.m., horror writers from all over Southern California will converge on the Pasadena Central Library for an afternoon of panels and book signings.

Co-presented by the library and the Southern California chapter of the Horror Writers Association, the event will begin at 1 p.m. with three panel discussions: “
Introduction to Horror Books, Including Recommended Reading”; “Comics and Graphic Novels in Horror”; and “Adaptations From Books to Film”. At 3 p.m., authors will sell and sign their books. Participating authors include:

Anthony Ray Bench (Stronger )
Hal Bodner (The Trouble With Hairy)
Steven W. Booth (The Hungry 1-6)
Robert Payne Cabeen (Fearworms)
Tim Chizmar  (Naked Alien Massacre)
Tananarive Due (The Living Blood)
Benjamin K. Ethridge (Bottled Abyss)
Michael Paul Gonzalez (Angel Falls)
Eric J. Guignard (After Death...)
Brad C. Hodson (Darling)
Janet Joyce Holden (Carousel)
Nancy Holder (the Wicked Saga)
Kate Jonez (Ceremony of Flies)
Kate Maruyama (Harrowgate)
Eric Miller (Hell Comes to Hollywood)
Roh Morgon (Watcher)
Lisa Morton (Netherworld)
John Palisano (Nerves)
Ian Welke (The Whisperer in Dissonance)
Terry M. West (A Psycho's Medley)
David Winnick (Sulfur)

The event is free and open to the public.

The Pasadena Central Library is located at 285 East Walnut Street, Pasadena, CA 91101. For more information on the library (including directions and maps), please visit http://cityofpasadena.net/library/central_library.aspx.

For more information on the Horror Writers Association, please visit http://www.horror.org. For further information on the event, please contact Eric J. Guignard at eric.guignard@gmail.com.


Thursday, June 12, 2014

Book Reviews (June, 2014)

Book Reviews! Each of the following books may be purchased through any large book store or online through www.amazon.com.

***

REVIEWED: The Abominable
WRITTEN BY: Dan Simmons
PUBLISHED: October, 2013

I find that one of the greatest indications of talent in authors is the ability to write in entirely different styles and voices, and this Dan Simmons possesses in excess. He has the ability to weave tight narrative, to fill dialogue with humor and insight and fear, has the ability to create worlds set in the future, present, or past. Quite simply, he outputs vast diversity amongst his many stories. The downside of this talent is that the reader doesn’t know what to expect when beginning one of his new works. Perhaps my mind just had expectations of heart-pounding action or of supernatural mayhem, but reading ‘The Abominable’ was somewhat boring.

I love historic genre fiction, and I think Simmons is one of the absolute best in this field. His prose is beautiful and carefully crafted to convey the spirit of the era he’s writing in. Simmons knows every detail of every manufacturer, every geographic element, every slang in vernacular that his characters encounter. But in this latest book, he simply takes it too far. Tens of pages go into the detailed explanation of climbing shoes and chapters of description explain the ins-and-outs of scaling every type of ice, differences in toeholds, variations of granite, distribution practices of pack suppliers, etc.

The author has done his research and he seems to want to cram every footnote of those studies upon you. The story itself is a well-crafted drama, written in memoir fashion, but Simmons could have cut out half of it and the novel would have succeeded twice as well. Overall, it’s a rich and magnificent book, but entirely too slow-moving for my subjective taste.

Four out of Five stars

***

REVIEWED: Clean Freak
WRITTEN BY: Sean M. Davis
PUBLISHED: August, 2013

‘Clean Freak’ is the first novel written by author Sean M. Davis, and it’s certainly a freshman triumph. The main character, Clarence, suffers from OCD germ avoidance. Naturally his occupation is as a janitor, and he takes his job seriously. At first, the in-depth description of Clarence cleaning door handles and desk surfaces seemed to be a bit over-indulgent, but that sense quickly gave way to a dark humor mirroring the character’s actions and thoughts, which led to more than one out-loud chuckle; in the most unseemly moment of suspense or danger or development, Clarence’s thoughts invariably turn to fears of some strange germ or illness developing from said event. The protagonist’s back story slowly comes through, so his actions and motivations begin to make more sense. I never quite understood the reason why his fellow janitors obsess in their own way to include Clarence in their games, nor did I relate entirely to the boss who seemed to waffle one way then the other, making contradictory decisions. But all that didn’t matter so much, as the grabber of the story is the dream-like little girl, Lucy, whom he befriends when her voice begins to speak to him from the bathtub drain. Who she is and what she represents offer Clarence’s most meaningful obsession.

Four and a half out of Five stars

***

REVIEWED: Annihilation (Book One of the Southern Reach trilogy)
WRITTEN BY: Jeff VanderMeer
PUBLISHED: February, 2014

Ugh, so many trilogies these days! You get hooked into a story and have to wait several months to find out what happens next. Such is the case with ‘Annihilation’ which speaks credit to author, Jeff VanderMeer; I want more of this book, and I want it now. It’s a wonderful, strange tale of exploration by four women – each with their own specialty – placed in a coastal point of the country which is mysteriously manifesting unexplainable occurrences. The style of writing and mood it sets is part ‘X-Files’ and part ‘Lost’ in that there are so many layers of peculiar doings, of conspiracy, of monsters and violence, and confusion, that the reader will either dismiss it all as arbitrary or find themselves drawn inexorably into its mysteries. I happen to be in the latter camp, though find no fault with those of the former; this book is truly not for everybody.

I happen to love the unknown and I love to explore and I love mysteries, and ‘Annihilation’ is all these things and more. I questioned some of the characters’ actions as stray or not true to themselves, but in a story like this I soon found it easy to suspend my disbelief, as at later points the author adds touches of further information which then lends credibility to earlier actions. This is a psychological thriller as much as anything; characters’ thoughts have been implanted, hypnosis is abundant, and the protagonist is infected by a mind-altering organism, so truly, ‘anything goes,’ though VanderMeer is respectful of this self-granted license; it’s not a self-serving experiment, but rather a deep character study in grief and resolution.

Five out of Five stars


***

Midnight cheers,

Eric J. Guignard